Posted by: philosopherouge | October 31, 2007

Stylus Magazine’s Top Films of the Millennium

Even being the classic film girl that I am, I can’t deny my love for modern cinema. As a fan of the old and the new, I couldn’t live in a better time where everything is quite literally at my fingertips and I’m not depending on old, battered and hard to find prints to get my fill.

This week Stylus Magazine released their “Top Films of the Millennium”, and colour me surprised… it’s an interesting list. Not only that, each entry actually has a thoughtful and interesting write-up! Shocking, I know.

Their list is as follows:
1. Mulholland Dr. (Lynch, 2001)
2. Children of Men (Cuaron, 2006)
3. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)
4. The New World (Malick, 2005)
5. You Can Count on Me (Lonergan, 2000)
6. Before Sunset (Linklater, 2004)
7. The Son (Jean-Pierre et Luc Dardenne, 2002)
8. Y Tu Mama Tambien (Cuaron, 2001)
9. Far From Heaven (Haynes, 2002)
10. A.I. (Spielberg, 2001)
11. Best of Youth (Giordana, 2003)
12. Cruel Winter Blues (Jeong-beom, 2006)

They also include personal lists from all the contributors, which includes more of my favourites. I haven’t seen all the films listed, #5-#7, and #11-12 I haven’t seen (although I’ve seen the first three hours of the Best of Youth which was beautiful, I need to catch up on that). I’m also not a huge fan of Y Tu Mama Tambien, and outright HATE A.I. The list itself is even somewhat token in it’s non-mainstream-ness… it frankly is the support the contributors offer explaining their claims that make this a truly interesting list.

Out of pure boredom, my list since 2000 would look something like this (only top 12 like their article):
1. The New World (Malick, 2005)
2. The Fog of War (Morris, 2003)
3. Spirited Away (Miyazaki, 2002)
4. Battle Royale (Fukasaku, 2000)
5. In the Mood for Love (Wong, 2000)
6. The Assasination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Dominik, 2007)
7. Marie Antoinette (Coppola, 2006)
8. Un Long Dimanche de fiancailles (Jeunet, 2004)
9. Inland Empire (Lynch, 2006)
10. Zodiac (Fincher, 2007)
11. Capote (Miller, 2005)
12. Far From Heaven (Haynes, 2002)

What are your thoughts on the list? What abour your favourite films of recent years?

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Responses

  1. It seems everyone detests “A.I” that it was refreshing to see it listed as one of the best films since 2000. I for one find it a thought provoking sci-fi gem, but I guess I’m part of the minority. But anyhoo my favorite movies of the past few years probably include: “Pan’s Labyrinth”, “A Prairie Home Companion”, “Once”, “The Barbarian Invasions” and “O Brother Where Art Thou?”

  2. I have not yet been able to embrace Terrence Malick at any level beyond his pretty nature compositions, however, I respect your list a lot more than Stylus Magazine’s, Rouge.

    A good name for their list might be, Best Films of the Millennium, excluding years 2008-2099.

    I would nominate Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon,
    Memento, Donnie Darko, Kill Bill, Sideways, Finding Nemo, and City of God.

  3. Jeremy: It’s really one of the most devisive films of the past few years. I know several people who hail it as a masterpiece, many are close friends of mine. Personally, even after seeing it twice never has a film incited so much anger from me. So much of it is my own bias though, I rarely like films about “robots”, I HATE Pinocchio, and generally am not a fan of the super sleek look of the film.

    I’ve actually seen all the films you’ve listed, and O’Brother and Pan’s almost made my own list. Once is one of my favourites of this year, Companion was a great swan song to an incredible career and I barely remember les Invasions Barbares.

    Joe: I understand the Malick thing, and it certainly is a big chunk of his work, but in every film I’ve seen of his he presents “nature” in a completely different way. In the New World, for example, he abstracts nature and what we are familiar with to truly create a “New World” through images. It’s far different than how he uses it in Days of Heaven or Badlands…

    Very true! It’s even a stretch that the films made before the 20th century are the best of their millenium, because really it operates in just a minute fraction of that entire span of time. It’s really an attention getter.

    I’m actually not much of a fan of Kill Bill (I’ve only seen the first though), and am lukewarm on Memento. Crouching Tiger is great, and Finding Nemo just missed my own list. I haven’t seen Dark, Sideways or City of God.

  4. I knew you liked A Very Long Engagement but not to that extent. Awesome.

  5. It might move down in the future. I tend to fall in love with films, and then come to my senses and move them to their appropriate position.

  6. Werckmeister Harmonies

  7. I haven’t seen that yet. I should update this list soon, because there are new ones that should be added! Namely the Coen brothers new film, No Country for Old Men, which is astonishing. 2007 is looking good.

  8. […] Did you like this brief introduction? Find out about it in full detail here. […]

  9. These are all my four-star films of this decade:

    1. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-Wai)
    2. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Andrew Dominik)
    3. Minority Report (Steven Spielberg)
    4. Gabrielle (Patrice Chéreau)
    5. A History of Violence (David Cronenberg)
    6. Ratatouille (Brad Bird)
    7. La Meglio Gioventu (Marco Tullio Giordana)
    8. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson)
    9. The Manchurian Candidate (Jonathan Demme)
    10. Munich (Steven Spielberg)
    11. V for Vendetta (James McTeigue)
    12. United 93 (Paul Greengrass)
    13. Zodiac (David Fincher)
    14. Gosford Park (Robert Altman)
    15. Before Sunset (Richard Linklater)
    16. Moulin Rouge (Baz Luhrmann)
    17. Children of Men (Alfonso Cuaron)
    18. Birth (Jonathan Glazer)
    19. The Bourne Ultimatum (Paul Greengrass)
    20. Gangs of New York (Martin Scorsese)
    21. Syriana (Stephen Gaghan)
    22. Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky)
    23. L’enfant (Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne)
    24. No Country for Old Men (Joel & Ethan Coen)
    25. Walk the Line (James Mangold)
    26. The Incredibles (Brad Bird)
    27. Babel (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu)
    28. The Constant Gardener (Fernando Meirelles)
    29. Kill Bill, Volume 2 (Quentin Tarantino)
    30. King Kong (Peter Jackson)
    31. Dogville (Lars Von Trier)
    32. One Hour Photo (Mark Romanek)
    33. Mystic River (Clint Eastwood)
    34. Punch-Drunk Love (Paul Thomas Anderson)
    35. Miami Vice (Michael Mann)
    36. Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola)
    37. Corpse Bride (Tim Burton)
    38. The Good Shepherd (Robert De Niro)
    39. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (George Clooney)
    40. Kill Bill, Volume 1 (Quentin Tarantino)
    41. Big Fish (Tim Burton)
    42. Eternal Sunshin of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry)
    43. Collateral (Michael Mann)
    44. Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (Steve Box & Nick Park)
    45. Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy)
    46. Good Night, and Good Luck (George Clooney)


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